Ep. 116: A conversation with Christina Cottiero and Expédit Ologou about Benin

Joining us this week are special guests Christina Cottiero, a political science PhD student at UC San Diego doing award-winning research on regional security issues in West Africa, and Expédit Ologou, the founder and president at the Civic Academy for Africa’s Future, an independent research think tank in Benin, and a Senior Political Governance Officer for the Benin Office of the Friedrich Ebert Stiftung. They join Rachel for a conversation about the presidential election in Benin and ongoing concerns about de-democratization in the country.

In the news wrap, Kim and Rachel talk about Lesotho’s political impasse, corruption in South African politics, connecting looted African art to the Black Lives Matter movement, and more. … More Ep. 116: A conversation with Christina Cottiero and Expédit Ologou about Benin

Links this week: Burundi elections, the relationship of democracy and COVID-19, and more

Follow the links below to connect to what you heard on episode 93, featuring a panel sponsored by the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies. Kim Dionne, Ufahamu Africa co-host, and Ken Opalo, a regular voice on the podcast, spoke on the politics and policy of COVID-19 on the continent.  From the news wrap:  … More Links this week: Burundi elections, the relationship of democracy and COVID-19, and more

Links this week: Lesotho inauguration, deaths of African footballers, and more on Kenya’s elections

Here are a few of the things we shared in this week’s episode that featured a conversation with Dr. Kennedy Opalo (@kopalo) on the upcoming Kenyan elections: Lipolelo Thabane, the estranged wife of Lesotho’s prime minister, Thomas Thabane, was shot dead last week. Ms. Thabane was only 58, and she and her friend were travelling … More Links this week: Lesotho inauguration, deaths of African footballers, and more on Kenya’s elections

From Episode #2: What we’re reading this week

Tom Whyman, a fellow at the University of Essex, wrote “SOAS students have a point. Philosophy degrees should look beyond white Europeans” in The Guardian this week. Building on campaigns like #RhodesMustFall (which protested the presence of statues of Cecil Rhodes on UCT’s campus) and calls for a structural decolonization of the syllabus, students at SOAS have … More From Episode #2: What we’re reading this week