Ep. 110: A conversation with N’Dri Assié-Lumumba about education and human capital in Africa

N’Dri Thérèse Assié-Lumumba joins us in conversation this week to discuss her new book, the history of human capital theory, education in Africa, and tells us what is giving her hope.

In this week’s news, we announce the winner of our student essay competition, share links to a virtual symposium on immigration and the changing dynamics of blackness, and talk about what is going on with COVID-19 vaccines on the African continent. … More Ep. 110: A conversation with N’Dri Assié-Lumumba about education and human capital in Africa

Ep. 109: A conversation with Grace Adeniyi-Ogunyankin, Francis Nyamnjoh, and George Ofosu

Not one guest, but three on our latest episode! Rachel speaks with Grace Adeniyi-Ogunyankin, Francis Nyamnjoh, and George Ofosu about postcolonial theory, decolonization of the university, and knowledge generation. All three have contributed to the Oxford Encyclopedia of African Politics, and we have access for our listeners to the chapters of our guests. … More Ep. 109: A conversation with Grace Adeniyi-Ogunyankin, Francis Nyamnjoh, and George Ofosu

Ep. 108: A conversation with Adom Getachew on postcolonialism, worldmaking, and more

In our last episode of Black History Month, Rachel interviews political theorist Adom Getachew on her new book, “Worldmaking after Empire: The Rise and Fall of Self-Determination.” Her book reconstructs an account of self-determination offered in the political thought of Black Atlantic anticolonial nationalists during the height of decolonization in the twentieth century.

We have lots of great recommendations for listeners this week, including books on race and feminism, a virtual event on African folktales, a virtual resource for those of us missing travel and fieldwork, podcast episodes you should listen to, and more! … More Ep. 108: A conversation with Adom Getachew on postcolonialism, worldmaking, and more

What we’re reading this week: authoritarianism in Tanzania, academic freedom in Malawi, genocide and justice in Namibia, and more

Related to the last episode‘s focus on seeking justice for descendants of the colonial genocide committed by Germans in present-day Namibia, there’s some good reporting in Deutsche Welle on the Namibian government considering suing Germany over reparations to compensate the genocide’s victims. If our episode was the first time you heard about the genocide in Namibia, … More What we’re reading this week: authoritarianism in Tanzania, academic freedom in Malawi, genocide and justice in Namibia, and more

Ep7. A conversation with Dr. Michelle Moyd on colonial East African soldiers

In this week’s episode, we chat with Dr. Michelle Moyd, Associate Professor of History at Indiana University. Dr. Moyd studies the history of soldiering and warfare in East Africa. She talked with us about her first book, Violent Intermediaries, which explores the social and cultural history of Askari, African soldiers in the colonial army of German East Africa. … More Ep7. A conversation with Dr. Michelle Moyd on colonial East African soldiers